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EPA Administrator Regan Inaugurates U.S. Embassy Air Quality Monitor in Mozambique
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January 22, 2024

EPA Administrator Regan Inaugurates U.S. Embassy Air Quality Monitor in Mozambique

PRESS RELEASE

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In the center of the photo: The the Air Quality Monitor Specialist John Wilbur, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Administrator Michael S. Regan, the U.S. Ambassador Peter H. Vrooman, the Air Quality Monitor Specialist, Nancy Wilbur, Dr. Adérito Aramuge, Director of the National Institute of Meteorology and Prof. António Santos Matos, Chairman of the Board of Maputo’s Metropolitan Transport Authority (AMT) and other U.S. Embassy staff at the inauguration of the air quality monitor at a U.S. Embassy facility in Maputo.
In the center of the photo, from the second from the left to the right: The Air Quality Monitor Specialist John Wilbur, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Administrator Michael S. Regan, the U.S. Ambassador Peter H. Vrooman, the Air Quality Monitor Specialist, Nancy Wilbur, Dr. Adérito Aramuge, Director of the National Institute of Meteorology and Prof. António Santos Matos, Chairman of the Board of Maputo’s Metropolitan Transport Authority (AMT) and other U.S. Embassy staff at the inauguration of the air quality monitor at a U.S. Embassy facility in Maputo.

January 22, 2024 – Today, United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Administrator Michael S. Regan and U.S. Ambassador Peter H. Vrooman joined Prof. António Santos Matos, Chairman of the Board of Maputo’s Metropolitan Transport Authority (AMT), and Dr. Adérito Aramuge, Director of the National Institute of Meteorology, to inaugurate an air quality monitor at a U.S. Embassy facility in Maputo.  “Monitoring air quality is vital for collective efforts to protect the health of those we serve,” said U.S. EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “I’m proud to be in Mozambique to mark its entry into our global network of air quality monitors. We are also pleased to offer training to Mozambique government officials on modeling air quality, as part of its efforts to combat pollution.”

Air quality data from this new monitor will soon be available on EPA’s AirNow.gov website, enabling the public and government decision makers to track air quality in real time. “Poor air quality affects us all, but it can be particularly acute for vulnerable communities,” Ambassador Vrooman said at the inauguration.  “Consistent, transparent, and reliable air quality monitoring is the first step to addressing these environmental challenges.”

The U.S. Department of State and the U.S. EPA are working together to record and make publicly available the air quality measurements nearly 80 embassies and consulates overseas that provide local communities with the information they need to make informed health decisions. Air pollution is linked to significant health effects — and those effects may be more severe for people with heart or lung disease, children, and older adults.  The World Health Organization estimates that more than 90 percent of the world’s population is exposed to hazardous levels of air pollution. The air quality monitor measures an air pollutant called PM 2.5, also referred to as “soot,” which are particles small enough to enter one’s lungs or bloodstream.